Thursday, 25 May 2017

Daytime Moth Hunt

Encouraged by the morning's catch and George's reported sighting of Cauchas fibulella on Speedwell flowers I decided to embark on a scrutiny of Veronica sp. flowers yesterday afternoon - there seems to be an abundance of it (Speedwell) this year, both in the garden and on the fringes of the paddocks. Nothing of interest was spotted initially, but I persevered and eventually spotted some small moths on a clump of Speedwell at the far side of the property:


Sadly not C. fibulella, but a Glyphipterix species, almost certainly G. simpliciella.  I also saw the familiar Micropterix calthella on the same batch of flowers.  I have also been seeing this species regularly on the May flowers in the garden, but yesterday was the first sighting of M. aruncella:


A footnote to yesterday morning's catch: the two female Muslin Moths remained static at the release point overnight, the only change this morning being  that they were accompanied by a clutch of 21 eggs.


I shall certainly make an effort to hatch them out and release the offspring somewhere safe.

5 comments:

  1. Well spotted on the Germander Speedwell. Nice to see you've had two female Muslin, stunning moth. My Muslin eggs took 10 days to hatch. By day 9 they turned from the colour of cream pearls to a 'dirty' grey colour. They were hatching at 10.30 am, all 33 of them, and growing well. Will post a photo of the Cream moth to get your opinion on it. Had my very first Spectacle moth to corner light last night 24 May. What a little character, thought it was going to be bigger than it was.

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  2. I shall use your timings for the Muslin eggs as a guide, Jacqueline. That's assuming that mine are fertile! It will be nice to see the Cream Wave photo, one was posted on Monday on the Ceredigion blog. I haven't had Spectacle yet this year but I would expect to see one or two eventually.

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  3. Glyphipterix simpliciella seems to be having a bumper year - I've had two in my urban garden (only one previous record in 10 years) and at a woodland in Monmouthshire yesterday there were 100s of them on flowers of Wood Spurge, buttercup, etc.

    Always nice to see aruncella among the hordes of calthella!

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  4. Glad that you seem to have caught the `non-trapping` recording bug Chris - it really does yield results!

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    1. It's fine during the day Ian, but come the evening...other things to do, so I rely on the traps.

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