Saturday, 11 March 2017

Agonopterix

Ian said to look out for micros and I had two last night.
I'm really shaky on micros but is the first one Agonopterix ocellana?
The next two are of the same moth and I havent a clue! Also experimenting with getting half decent pics of the little blighters!
Also had an Early Thorn, a Twin spotted Quaker, 2 Engrailed, Hebrew Character, some Common Quaker and Clouded Drab. Will try again tonight further up in the wood.


8 comments:

  1. The mystery one is a very plain form of Ypsolopha ustella - it hibernates as an adult.

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  2. Your first one looks - as you suggest - like A. ocellana to me Jane.

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  3. I am also finding the micros very flighty when trying to photograph them. Both the Acleris Literana and the Oak Nycteoline from Friday 10th trap, made a bid for freedom in the kitchen. Managed to recapture the AC by using a uv torch. Photographed and released. Now for the Oak Nycteoline to turn up and it was a beauty too......

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  4. Adjustment to my comment above. I managed to recapture the AL (not AC). Even after a nights rest in the fridge doesn't settle the micros, as soon as I edge them out of tub, off they fly, with them being so small it's easy to lose sight of them.

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  5. It's worth taking a 'record shot' photo of micros in the tube or its lid, whatever they have settled on. Sometimes they will subsequently pose on a nicer substrate, but often not.

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  6. PS these micros hibernate as adults, so the cold of the fridge doesn't really mean much to them. I can't think of an alternative calming method other than Co2.

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