Friday, 12 August 2016

Early August at Maenol

Five trapping sessions so far this month have produced a motley selection of familiar species on each occasion.  Last night was no exception, yielding 72 individuals of 22 species from two actinic traps. Most notable were a Ringed China-mark and Caryocolum blandella, first and second sightings for the year respectively.


Another second for the year was this Ermine; like the first, a few weeks ago, this one seems to be very white, including the terminal fringe, which suggests Yponomeuta cagnagella.






I caught the pug a week ago and still haven't managed to name it. The large discal spot and prominent tornal spot are distinctive, could it be a grey Wormwood Pug?  The caterpillar is another puzzle from a week or so ago.  It was found on a Raspberry leaf, but I've absolutely no idea of the species. Perhaps someone might recognise it?




Finally a very tatty Cloaked Carpet from the night of 2 August, in contrast to Jane's fine specimen in Ian's blog below.









P.S  I apologise for the strange lay-out of the photographs, I have yet to acquire the skill of arranging reduced-size photos and script in the way I would like to put them.

5 comments:

  1. I think it's a Golden-rod Pug Chris. The larva looks interesting, will have a think about that...

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  2. Golden-rod Pug would be very good, George, firstly because I've not had one before, and secondly I've no Golden-rod in the garden, a plant I've intended to introduce but haven't got a round tuit! Many thanks as usual.

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  3. The name is a bit misleading Chris, it is more often found on Ragwort.

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  4. I think the larva is Peach Blossom. Have a look at the images at the link below - clearly a variable larva but there are some which are similar to your specimen. The website also mentions raspberry (Rubus idaeus) as a foodplant in addition the usual bramble.

    http://www.lepiforum.de/lepiwiki.pl?Thyatira_Batis

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  5. Thanks George, I should have thought of Peach Blossom having come across the larvae before, albeit many years ago, and there's a reasonable b&w illustration in Richard South. The on-line images are pretty conclusive, as you say, very variable though!

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