Monday, 17 August 2015

I'm back with photos!!


Having installed Google Chrome as blogger apparently doesn't like IE as a browser, I can now post my photos again and ask my questions.


I saw this lovely magpie moth at the start of my walk on 10/8 as it fluttered down into a shallow puddle in front of me.  Having taken my photo whilst it was immobilized by surface tension, I used a fingertip to gently remove it and it flew off unharmed.


Is this a Timothy Tortrix? it was the diameter of a 10p coin, approx 23 mm which is slightly larger than the size mentioned in the reference books.  Photo 10/8  Moth identified as a dingy footman by Ian, Thank you.


The second generation of wall brown as mentioned in my previous blog.  This was one of a pair sunning themselves on a blanket of thistledown on 13/8.


Is this Agriphila straminella?  Corrected to Agriphilia selasella by Barry - thanks, see comments below. There are loads of micromoths on Ffos Las and I have to admit that lots of them look almost identical to me.  Maybe this is partly due to the fact that I don't take my reading glasses with me when out walking, but looking at the photos on the computer with my glasses on doesn't make the differences seem much more obvious.  Photo 13/8


Is this rather battered specimen a Pebble hook moth?  Photo 13/8

8 comments:

  1. Photo 2 looks like a dingy footman Maggie and yes, your last pic is a pebble hook-tip. Nice photo of a wall butterfly.

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    1. Are you sure that it is a dingy footman as my reference book says that they are 35mm whereas my moth was about 23 mm? Thanks for the confirmation of the pebble hook-tip and the compliment on the wall brown.

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  2. The Agriphila looks like selasella

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  3. Phew, I was going to say that was A selasella but was hesitating because I find the split from A tristella difficult from photos. Thanks Barry!

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  4. Thanks for the confirmation. What do you think of photo2?

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  5. It has the look/jizz of a footman, rather than a tortrix, so I don`t think it is as you suggest.

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    1. Thanks, Ian. I'll obviously go with your I/D rather than mine as there is a huge gulf in our respective knowledge and experience of moths.

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