Saturday, 6 June 2015

Odonata at Ffos Las

The damsels and dragons are starting to appear in larger numbers now that the weather is warming up at last.
 

 
Male and female beautiful demoiselles are the first Odonata I see each year, appearing from early May.

 
Common blue damselfly.
 
 
Azure damselfly.
 
 
A scarce blue-tailed damselfly.  As its name suggests, this is scarce and localised and can be distinguished from the more common blue-tailed damselfly by the blue segment at the end of the abdomen whereas the blue-tailed has a black segment at the end below the blue.
 
 
A teneral (juvenile) blue-tailed damselfly yet to develop the mature colouration, but it can be seen that the penultimate abdominal segment will become blue.
 
 
4-spot chasers are now whizzing around the ponds area, pausing for brief moments on the vegetation. I saw my first emperor dragonfly on Thursday, but no hope of photographing it as it showed no sign of landing in the half hour I was watching.
 
 

5 comments:

  1. Nice photos again Maggie. Perhaps Ffos-las could be the venue for the Moth Group`s annual outing this year - a bit of daylight recording? I`ll have a chat with Sam about the possibility.

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    1. That sounds good to me and I'm happy to help in any way I can. The car park of the Trimsaran leisure centre would be a good place to meet unless you want to organise it through the racecourse. The circuit of public footpaths that I walk isn't easily reached from the racecourse car parks.

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  2. Last one is Four-spotted rather than Broad-bodied Chaser, apologies if you already knew that and the text below wasn't meant as a caption. George

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    2. Thanks George. I agree that the original text was unclear, so I have amended it to read as a caption. I did identify a different 4-spotted chaser correctly on a previous blog posted 23rd May but always welcome corrections for mistakes.

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