Sunday, 5 October 2014

1st attempt at leaf-mines...(part 1)

I'd like to echo all the comments below - thanks Sam et al for a very informative and enjoyable couple of hours yesterday. It was good to see so many keen moth-ers in the county. Duly enthused, I had a brief wander around my usual mothing patch today to see if i could add some more micros to the list. I found plenty and have tried to id them - I apologise for the number of photos but I believe Sam that we need to get them confirmed at this stage? So (at the risk of being teacher's pet...) here goes:

1. Stigmella aurella (on bramble)
2. Phyllonorycter coryli (on hazel)
3.Unknown on hazel

4. S.ulmariae (on meadowsweet)?
5. P.rajella (on alder)
 And as a minor break from leaf mines here's a couple of attractive insects from Gelli Aur:


Stilt bug (Metatropis rufescens) (I think)
Rhododendron leafhopper

6 comments:

  1. 2 and 3 look good.

    4 is a fly mine (messy looking with twin frass trails)

    5 - not sure alder mines can be confidently ID'd without seeing the larvae/pupae, or rearing through?

    Note re Stigmella aurella/splendidissimella - in Glamorgan Dave has discouraged us from recording these two species based on the mine features alone, as it is now believed that there is some overlap between the two species in terms of frass dispersal in the mine.

    Great bug pics!

    Shame I couldn't make it to Gelli Aur, sounds like a nice outing.

    George

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  2. Thanks George, i didn't think it could be that straightforward! Did you have any ideas for 3 as i haven't attempted to id it?
    Thanks for the info re. aurella/splendissimella too.

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  3. 3 is most likely to be S floslactella

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  4. Sorry re 3, for some reason I got it in my head you'd labelled it as S microtheriella! But agree with Sam that floslactella probably more likely.

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  5. In Carms, the rhododendron leafhopper Graphocephala fennahi is only known from Gelli Aur and Stradey Estate (Llanelli), where I found both in Sept 2006. It peaks on warm days in Aug-Sept when they can be seen in sunshine flying around on the warm, sunny of rhodos. It is likely to be at other old estates with rhododendron collections.
    Good that you got a photo Vaughn!

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  6. PS...your other bug is also correctly named.

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