Monday, 22 September 2014

Enthusiastic but no common sense!

Reports of Clifden nonpariels being caught elsewhere induced a fit of illogical enthusiasm in me yesterday evening. The night-time weather was forecast to be completely unsuitable (cold and clear) and simple observation confirmed that when the traps were set up just before dusk. It was the sort of night when anyone with any common sense would refrain from trapping. The weather is set to improve for trapping Tuesday night onwards (but no good tonight, Monday).
There were no great rarities awaiting me this morning, and the MV only had two moths in it whereas the 40V actinic fared better, with about 30 or so moths, mostly large yellow underwings, setaceous hebrew characters and light emeralds.
There was one migrant in the latter trap though - a solitary dark sword-grass (photo below).


I also had the rather small (<8mm length) tortricid shown below. Is it Clepsis consimilana please? I did consider Cacoecimorpha pronubana (`carnation tortix`) but the overall shape looked wrong. Both my suggestions may be incorrect!


I hear from one participant that the weekend`s `micro course` at Cilgerran went well....we`ll have more success recording micros in Carmarthenshire from now on!

6 comments:

  1. I think reports of Clifden nonpariels have been rather premature, so I wouldn't worry too much!

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  2. Dave - I saw a blinking huge swarm of them - heading towards Llanelli - last night (in my dreams!), but then I woke up! Drat!

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  3. Ian, perhaps you should adopt the rule that the Berkshire Moth Group had in 1998 at the time of their first Clifden Nonpareil record - all incoming migrants had to pass through one of their members' (Steve Nash's) trap before they were allowed to go further.

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  4. Tort is probably a Pandemis. No books here for checking.

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  5. Is the Pandemis a female cinnamomeana? There ahve been a few of these in VC41 recently.

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  6. I thought cinnamomeana as I get it quite often here in Sept, but the basal patch looks typical of heparana

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