Monday, 28 July 2014

A few maps

Here are some maps for species mentioned in recent posts (click on them to make them bigger):

  
 
Galium Carpet (left) and Northern Rustic (right) have upland distributions, but in rather different ways, with no records of the latter from the Mynydd Llanllwni central hills.  It also occurs on the SW coast.


Brown-line Bright-eye (left) and Crescent (right) are both primarily coastal.  Brown-line Bright-eye is associated with dry grasslands, whereas Crescent is a wetland species.  My Brechfa record from Saturday night is likely to be a wanderer from the Tywi or Teifi.


Double Kidney (left) and Lesser Cream Wave (right) are always 'good' species to see, as they usually turn up only once or twice a year at most sites.  Both are more widespread in the county than I would have anticipated.
 
 

Phycita roborella (left) is surprisingly uncommon in the county, and Chris' record is the first I'm aware of from the Carms side of the Teifi valley; I had it new to Brechfa this summer too.  Small Elephant Hawk-moth is surprisingly widely scattered, but does seem to be resident in the Brechfa/Llanllwni area and on Mynydd Du.  Isabel's record is new for SN74.

12 comments:

  1. FYI - I've recorded Brown-line Bright-eye this year. Isabel

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  2. Do you mean Bright-line Brown-eye?

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  3. Fascinating set of maps as always Sam! please consider another set in due course. Did n`t realise that brown-line bright-eye was so localised. Northern rustic has a 2009 (14 Aug, IKM) record from Ragwen Point in SN20, which is not shown (also recorded here in 2014).

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  4. I used to see Small Elephant H-M each year in SN72 until 2006 - haven't seen it since then.

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  5. Yes Sam I do - sorry! Who the hell names these moths!

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  6. Confused and Uncertain? Conformist, or Noncomformist? Bright-line Brown-eye,or Brown-line Bright-eye? I t doesn't get any better if you stick to scientific names: Swammerdamia, Pseudoswammerdamia, Paraswammerdamia. Blame the Victorians, I say!

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  7. The brown-bright-eye-line name muddle is all too easy! Luckily one is much rarer than the other so Jon and I can spot the potential problems. Both turn up at Dingestow, though at 20:1 ratio, so the few brown-line bright-eye were marked with a big arrow in my notebook.

    I get Brindled Green and Frosted Green muddled, but one is autumn and one spring so again my muddles are spotable

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  8. Steve, I use the second part of the scientific name for Micros. There is surprisingly little overlap, at least in Carms, though straminea vs straminella is confusing

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    1. Don't worry, Sam - I've not seen any of those Damn swammers!

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  9. Look!....getting names mixed up is my speciality! I`m world champion! (esp when I`m brain dead the morning after trapping).

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  10. Moth name dyslexia is something we all suffer from time to time - add in the changes to the scientific names of the micros and it gets even worse!!!

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  11. ....I`ve mixed up clay and brick before....you can see the connection (clay is used to make bricks, but not in the moth sense!).

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