Friday, 11 October 2013

Aspen leaf mines

I`d had a hospital visit today, followed by some boring `have-to-do` shopping errands, so after my return home and a `quick bite to eat` I went to that part of the Millennium Coastal Park between Burry Port and Pwll. I wanted to make a mental map of the distribution of aspen trees and thickets that had been planted approximately 15 years ago in readiness for moth trapping next year (there`s some good moths on aspen!).
I noticed that some leaves were leaf-mined and I include photos of bottom and top leaf views below. Two possibilities are the micro-moth Stigmella assimilella or the dipteran Aulagromyza tremulae, but I`m quite uncertain and will welcome any opinions from moth-ers within or outside Carmarthenshire.

Note: I wish I had read the always-excellent Gower Wildlife blog before going for my `aspen recce` and had consequently kept my eyes open for yellow-browed warblers, this being exactly the time of year when they turn up on passage. Mark Hipkin et al found one in nearby Glamorgan (- well done!). I`ve never seen a yellow-browed warbler and the area just west of Burry Port looks ideal!

7 comments:

  1. The way the end of all 3 mines has been cut/fell out looks very odd for a Stigmella. It could be the Aulagromyza (my Agromyzidae book says A tremulae is on the underside of leaves, like your mines Ian). However, it doesn't feel quite right for either of these.

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  2. Check this site out http://www.ukflymines.co.uk/Keys/POPULUS.php

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  3. PS it was Mark not Charles who saw the YBW ;)

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  4. Thanks all for helpful comments....off out this pm to look for a ceratin warbler!

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  5. a ceratin warbler?! nice typo - suggests some odd hairy singing thing...

    thanks for the website reference Barry. Ian's mines don't look like any of the other species, so Aulagromyza tremulae seems the right ID, and I guess the emergence of the adult flies a while back has left fragile areas that have since fallen out.

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  6. Thanks again, to all for comments. I`ve corrected the incorrect `Hipkin name`. I saw the ceratin warbler (`the hardest warbler in the World`?) typo, but could n`t find a way of altering the comment, save re-doing it, so I did n`t bother!

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  7. I hope the bird information services don't spot "ceratin" warbler and further mangle it to caerulean...

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