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Saturday, 17 August 2013

Last minute trapping at Salem

I wasn't going to trap but it clouded over and the wind dropped as it got dark so I rushed my trap out. It paid off as I got over 60 species (plus the few micros I'd like help with!) including this which I believe is a Bulrush wainscot?
I've never had one before (either here or at Parc Slip) and there is no Typha  nearby but the ukmoths website does say they are wanderers. Was a pleasant surprise anyway. The trap was dominated by large yellow underwings (54) and flame shoulders (37) with my highlights being a couple of gold spots, oblique carpet, purple thorn, sallow kitten, chinese character and copper underwings. Immigrants were represented by 4 silver Y and 3 dark sword-grass.

Micros I struggled with: I know Acleris laterana and comariana are difficult to separate - is it safe to say this is the former given the time of year or is it best to record as either/or?
Another tortrix - not well-marked enough for me to id:
Closest I could get with the following was holly tortrix?
Despite this one being well-marked I couldn't find it in the book (I do have a side-on photo if required:
And finally, another apple/spindle ermine - Sam, I know my parents don't have spindle but they do have a couple of apple trees!
Any id help gratefully received!
Vaughn



6 comments:

  1. Well first of all, well done on a new Micro for Carms - that's Gelechid a very well-marked Caryocolum blandella, which feeds on Greater Stitchwort and has been recorded from almost all the other Welsh VCs. I'm glad you didn't try shoe-horning it into one of the Gelechids that is in the book!

    The Acleris looks good for laterana, the Pandemis is probably cerasana but is too worn to be sure, the Holly Tortrix is correct, and I think you're right that the Yponomeuta is malinellus.

    I've had Bulrush Wainscot here a couple of times, and Large Wainscot as well. These wetland things do wander, but are always exciting to catch inland.

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  2. Excellent, that's very exciting - thanks Sam. Definitely worth putting the trap out!
    Thanks for all the other ids too. Final count of 315 moths of 64 species, plus 13 common wasps, 8 Nicrophorus investigator and 1 Serica brunnea.

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  3. I'm glad you're doing those beetles. Are you using the superb photo guide that appeared in the Glamorgan Moths Newsletter a few years ago. I've now had 5 spp of Nicrophorus plus Necrodes litoralis in S Wales, and at least 4 of those have come to my MV.

    We had several Serica brunnea to MV at Keepers. I've no idea of their status in Carms, but I assume they're pretty common. Ian will be able to tell us if there's a DIG Newsletter on Chafers in Carms!

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  4. I`ll scan in the carrion beetle article from the Glamorgan Moth Recording Gp Newsletter and make it available, after asking Barry Stewart`s/others permission. I`d been thinking of doing it anyway!
    Well done re the moth records too, Vaughn.....you`ll have a mention in the Winter Newsletter!!!

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  5. I`ll scan in the carrion beetle article from the Glamorgan Moth Recording Gp Newsletter and make it available, after asking Barry Stewart`s/others permission. I`d been thinking of doing it anyway!
    Well done re the moth records too, Vaughn.....you`ll have a mention in the Winter Newsletter!!!

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  6. No I haven't got that guide but it would be great if it could be made available - I just use a combination of a couple of general insect books plus the internet!
    As to the chafer; I haven't seen one before to my knowledge and certainly haven't had one come to the trap. I had a couple of other black beetles but I must admit to discarding them as they didn't look distinctive enough to be ided easily...

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