Saturday, 13 July 2013

Carmel on Friday - and a double line discussion

55 species last night including first for year dark spectacle, triple-spotted clay, small seraphim and twin-spot carpet.  Top 3 were double line (16), burnished brass (11), coronet (10).  Picking up on Sam's discussion of Common and Local, I generally refer to Jon's comprehensive 2006 report which gives status of a species in the County at the time (I don't think we have an easy link to it on the blog so have tried, and failed, to add it - Colin? - help!).  With a marked increase in recording, the status, as I think has been pointed out before, has changed for some species. The aforementioned double line is a case in point, at least for me at Carmel. I caught 5 in 2008 and there has been an almost continuous year-on-year increase to 28 last year - with 40, so far, this year.  This is with reasonably consistent trapping effort. It feeds on grasses and, according to the book, is particularly associated with rhos pasture in our area (it's nationally scarce). Although I've managed my few patches of meadow in a similar way for 20+ years there has been a program of grassland restoration in nearby Carmel NNR, so I think my increase could be down to this (although neither area could be described as rhos).  It's very interesting to see that Sally has just caught her first double line when I know she has some good grasslands there.  What have others found?

3 comments:

  1. Well I haven't been trapping long enough or regularly enough to notice a pattern where I trap (my parents smallholding) but it certainly isn't rhos pasture. 8 acres of what used to be hay/pony-grazed meadow. Surrounding that is dairy farming. Our meadows are certainly quite nice with lots of self-heal, yellow rattle and ragged robin but, as I said, not rhos! (15 double line for me last night).

    ReplyDelete
  2. As people have already said, not only will there be different perceptions of what is common etc across the UK (wildlife guides are often `southern English` in bias when it comes to species status perceptions) but we also -expectedly- have variations within our county. This is to be expected and reflects the catchment habitats of the traps.
    Re Jon`s 2006 list, I think that it would be useful to update it to reflect changes in knowledge since that date....something for the winter months!
    Re the double line, it is not exclusively a rhos specialist...it just likes the rank grass admixture that you sometimes get on `rhos`....it is, for example common on that rank grassy field within the [ex] Gelli Aur Country Park.

    ReplyDelete
  3. As people have already said, not only will there be different perceptions of what is common etc across the UK (wildlife guides are often `southern English` in bias when it comes to species status perceptions) but we also -expectedly- have variations within our county. This is to be expected and reflects the catchment habitats of the traps.
    Re Jon`s 2006 list, I think that it would be useful to update it to reflect changes in knowledge since that date....something for the winter months!
    Re the double line, it is not exclusively a rhos specialist...it just likes the rank grass admixture that you sometimes get on `rhos`....it is, for example common on that rank grassy field within the [ex] Gelli Aur Country Park.

    ReplyDelete